Principal Research Fellow (Faculty, Senior Lecturer in Structural Biology)
Jon Nield, Ph.D.
j.nield 'at' qmul.ac.uk
Principal Investigator / JST/CREST, Special Advisor (2014)
Academic Visitor, Imperial College (2015)

Research Fellow (JST/CREST funded, Structural Biology)
Karim Maghlaoui, Ph.D.
k.maghlaoui ‘at’ qmul.ac.uk

Ph.D. student (w/Prof. Richard Pickersgill)
Ms Liang Wang (& Support Worker)
l.wang ‘at’ qmul.ac.uk


Equipment used in researching photosynthetic complexes:
- for structural studies
Instrumentation (JEOL 1230 / JEOL 2010 TEMs) within Queen Mary's NanoVision centre is used to record image data via CCD (2k x 2k; 16 bit TIFF) or micrographic film prior to single particle image processing across a wide range of local and collaborative projects. Jon sits on the management board, co-ordinating projects of a biological TEM nature, and welcomes any contacts or queries in this regard.

Pre-2007, data for single particle image averaging projects were gained through the use of FEI (Philips) CM100 (100 keV), Tecnai T12 (120 keV) or CM200 (200 keV) FEG (Field Emission Gun; liquid Nitrogen-cooled) transmission electron microscopes of Imperial College's Centre for Structural Biology (IC-CBEM).

A Linux cluster for the group has been recently upgraded and reconfigured (160-CPU, 336 Gb RAM) for local image-processing.

- for investigating biochemical function
The dark lab (℅ Norbert Krauss) in The Joseph Priestley building has access to a wide range of equipment at Queen Mary: Absorption spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, HPLC (size exclusion and reverse-phase), FPLC, gas chromatography, gel densitometry, oxygen electrodes, fluorescence induction and relaxation, crystallisation, plant/ bacterial growth greenhouses/culturing, autoclaves, several centrifuges (+ultras) are all available, either within the lab, down the corridor, or within 5 min.

Legacy equipment: Nikon LS9000 CoolScan densitometer
If required, a Nikon scanner is able to provide for 6.35 micron step-size scans of electron micrographs, at 16 bit greyscale (6 x 7.5 cm; holder manually machined to enable 6 x 9 cm films to be scanned). A typical total cycle scan-time per single micrograph is ~ 5 min. After testing, a 4 Angstrom structure is possible, but 6 Angstroms clearly achievable.

Lab Alumni:
Dr Ray Burton-Smith
Dr Kristina Zubow
Mr Matt Cullen
Mme Clemence Granier
Mr Boaz Odier
Dr (Ms) Jawon Song
Dr William Lee
Ms Vin Luang
Mr Wilfred Wu
Dr Dorothy Cheng
Ms Sali Liu
Ms Candy Xu
Ms Connie Zhang
Dr Yuan-Tsan Tseng
Dr Ben King
Dr Sven Nottebaum
Ms Lu Pan
Mr Laurence Darby
Dr Jonathan Ruprecht